itskamaria

unphazedcat:

boystears:

yung-ananas:

edgar-allen-hoe:

God bless white people. Home girl just starts fucking chomping here teeth.
Like what?

wtf kinda irl chain chomp

LMAO SHE STARTED EATING HER BREATHING SPACE

the only thing that matters in this video is the black girl in the back all unbothered putting on her eyeliner

(Source: realitytvgifs)


shoesforall:

Why I consider Beyonce A Feminist
I consider Beyonce a feminist for many reasons but the one I want to talk about right now is in regards to her model casting.
This is a still from her Yonce video. Besides Beyonce, of course, we see Chanel Iman, Jourdan Dunn and Joan Smalls. These models are the most prominent Black high fashion models of the last ten years. The industry has told these women over and over that they are in competition with one another; that if one is cast in a show that the others are not needed; that only one of them can be The Black High Fashion model at any given time. 
Beyonce is calling bullshit on that attitude. She put all three of them in her video because the “competition” between them is created by a racist industry that believes in the idea that there can only be one outstanding Black model at a time, a tokenism that aims to set these women against each other.
But this image, and the video they are all in, is an attack on that attitude. It declares that there is no reason all these women can’t be successful. This video brings a group of young women together who have been set in competition against each other. Beyonce is a powerful woman, possibly the most influential entertainer in American/Western pop culture, she is using that power to deconstruct a notion that women, in general, and Black women, in the culture of fashion, must be in competition with each other.
Beyonce seems to be saying that there is should be no competition between these women, real or perceived, but solidarity. I am not saying that the message is that they all have to be BFFs but that the industry created “tension” between them is based on ideas of white privilege and racism. After years of fashion people trying to tear them apart, Beyonce has brought them together, at least for one job. They are only in competition for jobs because a racist power structure has decided they should be. Beyonce directly challenges that notion by casting the three of them.
Beyonce’s casting embraces a vision of Blackness that includes multiracial models (Chanel Iman, who is Asian-African-American just as Kyla Ross is), Latina (Joan Smalls) and Jamaican-British (Jourdan Dunn).
Beyonce is a feminist. Don’t listen to anyone who tells you differently.
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shoesforall:

Why I consider Beyonce A Feminist

I consider Beyonce a feminist for many reasons but the one I want to talk about right now is in regards to her model casting.

This is a still from her Yonce video. Besides Beyonce, of course, we see Chanel Iman, Jourdan Dunn and Joan Smalls. These models are the most prominent Black high fashion models of the last ten years. The industry has told these women over and over that they are in competition with one another; that if one is cast in a show that the others are not needed; that only one of them can be The Black High Fashion model at any given time. 

Beyonce is calling bullshit on that attitude. She put all three of them in her video because the “competition” between them is created by a racist industry that believes in the idea that there can only be one outstanding Black model at a time, a tokenism that aims to set these women against each other.

But this image, and the video they are all in, is an attack on that attitude. It declares that there is no reason all these women can’t be successful. This video brings a group of young women together who have been set in competition against each other. Beyonce is a powerful woman, possibly the most influential entertainer in American/Western pop culture, she is using that power to deconstruct a notion that women, in general, and Black women, in the culture of fashion, must be in competition with each other.

Beyonce seems to be saying that there is should be no competition between these women, real or perceived, but solidarity. I am not saying that the message is that they all have to be BFFs but that the industry created “tension” between them is based on ideas of white privilege and racism. After years of fashion people trying to tear them apart, Beyonce has brought them together, at least for one job. They are only in competition for jobs because a racist power structure has decided they should be. Beyonce directly challenges that notion by casting the three of them.

Beyonce’s casting embraces a vision of Blackness that includes multiracial models (Chanel Iman, who is Asian-African-American just as Kyla Ross is), Latina (Joan Smalls) and Jamaican-British (Jourdan Dunn).

Beyonce is a feminist. Don’t listen to anyone who tells you differently.


medievalpoc:

dynamicafrica:

The Egyptian Mona Lisa

I never get bored of people playing around with DaVinci’s, especially when non-Western artists provide their own take on the ever-mysterious painting that is the Mona Lisa.

Here, Egyptian illustrator FaTma WaGdi places herself wearing a hijab in her digital rendition of this 16th century portrait, poking fun at the expressionless original subject.

Contemporary Art Week!


medievalpoc:

nitanahkohe:

Northern women sewing for North American moccasin project: 600 moccasin tops being sewn in memory of missing, murdered indigenous women

Women from across the North are stitching up a storm to prepare for a massive art project. They are part of a group that’s making more than 600 pairs of moccasin tops in memory of Canada’s missing and murdered indigenous women. The beaded works will be displayed as part of a travelling art installation project called Walking with our Sisters. Each pair of moccasins symbolizes the unfinished life of a missing or murdered woman.

Métis artist Christi Belcourt started the project. She said so far, more than 200 pairs have come in. "I’m always emotionally moved when a new pair comes in because I realize that one pair represents a women or a girl," said Belcourt. "People are really putting their love in the work. You can feel it when you hold it in your hand." The moccasin tops will be shown in a winding path on gallery floors. The first exhibition of the moccasin tops will open in Haida Gwaii in B.C. on Aug. 20.

Contemporary Art Week!


policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine


DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.
Not one major Hollywood studio has released a computer animated feature starring a black character.
Read more | Follow policymic
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policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine

DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.

Not one major Hollywood studio has released a computer animated feature starring a black character.

Read more | Follow policymic